Comparing Rhode Island’s Size

 

RI Texas

I recently received this incredible shirt (I think the Easter bunny must stalk my Facebook page…but the shirt is also available online here).  I loved the idea behind it; the T-shirt mingles big-state bravado that declared regional superiority, with small-state insecurity that begs not to be forgotten. Both sentiments, even if they are on opposite side of the spectrum, display an enormous sense of regional pride and communal identity.  My first thought to check the truthfulness of this map was to see how many “Rhode Islands” there are in state Texas using this clever website that shows the number of areal units equal to the size of Rhode Island that are in any given country. And despite what that southwest bravado may lead you to believe, Texas isn’t its own country. So I needed to find a different website which lets you overlay any two places one on top of the other. This is a fantastic resource for help leverage your students’ local knowledge to teach them about places that are more remote and where their mental maps might have very little data.  So using those two websites, how accurate is this T-Shirt?  Now, any ideas on how to verify/debunk the oft repeated statement that Rhode Island is 3% larger at low tide?  Any geospatial ideas on how to conceptually go about answering this question? 

 And never mess with the Ocean State…even if this is Texas’ version of Earth Day.

2014-04-20 08.55.59  

GEOG 202 STUDENTS: Back to the geospatial, how can we make a map that compares two sets of data if we can’t make one on the layers more transparent?  line or point data is easy to lay on top of a coverage, but what if they are both coverages? This tutorial on how to make a swipe map (made by the incredible GIS champion Joseph Kerski) is just what we need.  It will give you one other type of StoryMap to add to your repertoire.    

 

So build a swipe map and a spyglass map…it’ll be fun.

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