2016 Giant Map

I was just informed that our proposal to receive a Giant Traveling Map from National Geographic was accepted! This year, we will be receiving Pacific Ocean Map Many schools find this a great way to make a fun event for the whole school; it will be available for schools and teachers to use from March 11th to April 4th.

Source: rigea.org

If you would like to simply attend an event with the Giant Traveling map, RIGEA will be hosting a event, free to the public that will feature, use, and explore this map in great detail.  This will be on March 31st (4-6pm) at Rhode Island College in the Student Union Ballroom.

Ocean State Ecology, Field Work, and BioBlitz

Are you new to the idea of a BioBlitz?  On April 30th, RIGEA will host an event at Rocky Hill’s amazing Land of Fires outdoor classroom.  We will get to explore, develop field experience, learn more about Rhode Island environments, map our findings, and share strategies to bring these programs to our students, classrooms and communities.  We will  work on skills and content to understand our local environments more intimately.  What could be more geographic than that?!?

WHEN: April 30th, 9am -2pm

WHERE: Rock Hill School’s Land of Fire (Rocky Hill School, 530 Ives Road, East Greenwich, RI, 02818).

Please RSVP (for a head count) by emailing rigea@ric.edu with the subject line “BioBlitz-Rocky Hill.” 

Source: rigea.org

Exploring the Pacific

If you would like to simply attend an event with the Giant Traveling map, RIGEA will be hosting a event, free to the public that will feature, use, and explore this map in great detail. This will be on March 31st (4-6pm) at Rhode Island College in the Student Union Ballroom. There will be some food, presentations, and a whole lot of map exploration…bring clean socks and a a desire to explore!

Source: rigea.org

Geospatial Institute

The 2015 Summer Institute on online mapping and geospatial technologies for educators was a great success.  We want to invite everyone back to follow-up on some projects and activities since then (the great inspirational logo above is from GIS ETC.) 

 

WHEN: April 2nd, 2016 9am (lunch will be provided)

WHERE: RIC campus 101 Alger Hall (computer lab)

WHO: all 2015 summer institute participants and anyone wish to join mid-stream. 

Source: Geospatial Institute Recap

Teachers for Global Classrooms

This past summer, Sandra Makielski, seventh grade social studies teacher from Davisville Middle School, North Kingstown, traveled to the Philippines for an eighteen day educators’ trip. She was selected by Teachers for Global Classrooms, a U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs program, to participate in their 2015 Educators’ Trip.  Global education is integral to building 21st century skills, and this opportunity was designed to jump start a teacher’s classroom. The trip was punctuated with many, many selfies with students, delicious food, and the hospitality of schools, faculty, and strangers. Ms. Makielski learned about the educational system, Filipino history, and the important role the Philippines is currently playing in global politics. Ms. Makielski looks forward to incorporating her new knowledge of the Philippines into her social studies lessons.

Applications are now open at the Teachers for Global Classrooms website. Deadline is March 17, 2016.

Source: rigea.org

The 2016 CT High School Geography Challenge

The registration form for the May 17, 2016 CT HS Geography Challenge will be going out to all CT high school social studies department chairmen in November. We’re excited to announce the theme for the 2016 statewide interscholastic academic team competition is AMERICA’S NATIONAL PARKS!

Source: ctgeoalliance.org

The Connecticut Geographic Alliance has expanded their annual High School Geography Challenge to include some other teams in southern New England.  Any RIGEA member that would like to enter their high school to have a team participate in this competition can register here (2016 CT Registration form).

Geography as a Primary Source

“A geographic perspective is a way of looking at and understanding our world. When you view the world through the lens of geography, you are asking who, what, where, when, and how people, places, and things are distributed across the surface of the earth, and why/how they got there. In other words, it means that you are analyzing something with a geographic perspective. The understanding and use of a geographic perspective is critical for decision making skills in the 21st century. Using spatial concepts such as location, region, movement, and scale to help us understand:

  • Interactions – How the world works
  • Interconnections – How systems in our world are connected
  • Implications – How to make well-reasoned decisions”

@natgeo, Geography as a Primary Source

Source: www.instagram.com

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills.   The front of the handout is pictured above, and the field guide component on the back is pictured below.

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Tags: National Geographicperspective.

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

“For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: www.allaboutbirds.org

This still image above doesn’t do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources. 

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

“For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Source: www.allaboutbirds.org

This still image above doesn’t do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources. 

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.